Book Reviews

‘Leaping into Waterfalls’ and losing track of old friends

A long time ago I became friends with someone because her partner was my then-boyfriend’s uncle. The three of them lived together in an old terrace house in Fremantle, and we bonded over our love of red wine, books and morbid humour. She was twenty years older than me, but we somehow clicked, and when… Continue reading ‘Leaping into Waterfalls’ and losing track of old friends

Book Reviews, General Ramblings

Amanda Lohrey’s ‘The Labyrinth’ and making things by hand

All the animals at Berlin's Anoha museum are handmade from recycled objects by various Berlin artists The cure for many ills, noted Jung, is to build something, and this is the epigraph and theme of Amanda Lohrey’s atmospheric novel, The Labyrinth (Text). It’s my second read by a Tassie author this month and further proof… Continue reading Amanda Lohrey’s ‘The Labyrinth’ and making things by hand

Book Reviews

The History of Mischief by Rebecca Higgie

The word ‘mischief’ has always summoned up for me an unpleasant memory of being in the stuffy, bureaucratic waiting room of the local teacher’s union with my little sister as my mother went to another room for a meeting. Looking back, I can imagine her reservations about leaving us alone in the waiting room, and… Continue reading The History of Mischief by Rebecca Higgie

Book Reviews

Red Comet – The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark

Sylvia Plath lived her short life at break-neck, ravenous speed – she was a star student who went from Smith College to a nervous breakdown to Cambridge University as a Fulbright Scholar, where she met her future husband, the poet Ted Hughes, then back to the USA and then to Devon and London where she… Continue reading Red Comet – The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark